Yonder launches two seasonal beers

12 January, 2021

Somerset brewery Yonder has launched two seasonal beers featuring ingredients foraged in the local area.

Flying Wonder is a saison-style beer brewed with sea buckthorn berries sourced at the coast near Weston-Super-Mare in southwest England.

This 4.8% abv brew is inspired by the Greek mythology of Pegasus, the white-winged horse that would graze on sea buckthorn berries before soaring over Mount Olympus.

Who is Nellie? is a 7% abv triple-fruited melba sour beer, which is packed full of apricot, peach, raspberry and vanilla.

It is named after Nellie Melba, the Australian opera singer who became one of the most famous singers of the early 20th century.

Brewery founder Stuart Winstone said: “We are delighted to be launching our two new limited-edition beers, both of which use locally foraged ingredients from close to our modern farmhouse Somerset brewery. The beers represent our approach to brewing – celebrating local flavours and experimenting with amazing yeasts and microflora, while producing perfectly balanced and moreish beer.

“By brewing with the very best of local ingredients and alternative techniques that combine historic styles and modern brewing technology, our approach to mixed fermentation and barrel ageing puts the emphasis on balance of flavour and drinkability. Minimal intervention is the key to ensuring that there’s a little bit of nature in every sip.”  

Yonder’s core range of beer is available in 44cl cans and comprises: the flagship Raspberry Gose, a popular sour fruited beer with an abv of 4%; Acapella, a pilsner with an abv of 5.5%; Sub Culture, a 4.5% abv mixed fermentation dry-hopped pale ale, Coolbox, a 3.5% abv session helles beer, and Boogie, a 3.8% abv modern bitter.

Winstone and Jasper Tupman founded Yonder Beer & Brewing in 2018 after bonding over a shared passion for foraging and fermentation. Dave Williams is the head brewer and Lee Calnan is the sales director.





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