Feeling Blue

01 December, 2017

Aside from grape-based spirits, tequila is one of the few where terroir can effect the taste of the resulting spirit. It would be no surprise, therefore to start seeing more brands advertising how they grow their agave, where they grow it and how they harvest it. This is bound to excite the Bordeaux experts and curious Europeans, especially if the word ‘vintage’ starts appearing on bottles.

This level of appreciation for tequila may put more pressure on agave producers, but contrary to that the sipping culture may reduce consumption.

COCKTAIL CLUB

The current trend for premium tequilas in Europe is cocktails, which are still being pushed by some of the top brands, once again putting pressure on the agave producers.

Many of the top premium tequila brands attended London Cocktail Week, where Patrón hosted its Perfectionists competition, aimed at demonstrating what is possible behind a bar using its 100% agave tequila.

Don Julio’s De Colsa is also a big fan of tequila cocktails. “In Mexico 40 or 50 years ago no one was mixing tequilas, but with the cocktail culture we are growing. Tequila was created for that. In our range we have Blanco right through to Extra Anejo, so we’re the category for mixing.

“In my home I have a very large bar and I love making my own cocktails. I created a cocktail at home five years ago called Condemned, using tequila anejo, gin, peach, orange juice and lime.”

With the demand for and price of agave increasing, possibly for the next year at least, the quality of smaller 100% agave tequila could be under threat – along with its reputation.

Although it is unlikely, this could be an opportunity for well-produced regular tequilas to regain some of their market share if producers can regulate their agave supply and remain consistent.





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