Organic beer is no marketing tool

20 April, 2018

Organic beer is not just a marketing tool to gain bigger premiums, but a branch of the craft beer movement with integrity, according to UK-based Stroud Brewery.

The brewery meets the organic standards of the Soil Association, meaning that sustainability as at the forefront of the brand’s thinking.

Owner and managing director of Stroud Brewery, Greg Pilley, said: “Although organic is now mainstream our motivation is not organic branding to win a slice of the market, I think it would be difficult to run a 100% organic business if you didn't truly believe in it, you have to have integrity.

“It certainly does not give us an economic advantage, our raw materials are more expensive, produced by passionate farmers and artisan processors and yet for most of our available market we find it difficult to charge any additional premium.”

Stroud Brewery was formed in 2006 and now produces 11 beers for the on-trade and its off-trade beers are sold internationally.

“In terms of our markets there is some differentiation,” added Pilley. “Cask ales sold to pubs tend to be considered generically, and to date the industry and landlords in particular, compare products on price and their strength (%abv). However, this is changing.

“The craft beer movement has illustrated that all beers are not equal. There is diversity in hops and specialty malts, and that brewers can invest in their beers in many ways to produce truly unique products - inoculating with wild yeasts, barrel ageing etc. So recently we are finding an audience that can also appreciate the back story, the deeper values of an organic beer”.

Stroud Brewery gets its raw materials from local, organic sources which as well as health implications, is thought to better protect the local environment.

Pilley added: “We cant make a case for drinking more organic beer as a healthy drinking choice.

“However, if you are going to drink beer why not drink one where the main raw materials - barley and hops - have not been treated with pesticide and herbicides that could have a cumulative affect on our long term well-being, and without doubt do affect our countryside and waterways.”

Keywords: Stroud Brewery




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