Altia buys Xanté

23 January, 2012

Altia Plc is buying the Xanté Company and the Xanté spirits brand from the Swedish Tilander family.

The company says Xanté, which is a blend of sweet Belgium pears and cognac matured for four years in barrels made from the French Limousine oak, will help reinforce its position in the Nordic alcoholic beverage business and will play an key role in Altia’s international portfolio development. The brand is strong in the Nordic markets and it has a presence in international travel retail.

Altia’s strategy is based on two cornerstones – building own brands and providing a leading Nordic and Baltic route–to–market service for partners to develop their business.

“The acquisition of the Xanté premium brand represents a perfect fit with Altia’s strategy by expanding our market presence in the Nordics and Baltics and increasing our critical mass in the Nordic travel retail and in the international alcoholic beverage business,” says Altia CEO Antti Pankakoski.

Altia says the acquisition of Xanté is a continuation in executing Altia’s growth strategy. Altia acquired a portfolio of Swedish and Danish heritage spirits and wine brands as well as the Renault Cognac brand in 2010.

Xanté Company owner Jörgen Tilander: ”We look forward to continuing working with the brand as we will maintain the exclusive license to sell the brand in the US and Canada. We look forward to being partners with Altia and to continue to build a success for Xanté on the world’s biggest spirits market – The US.”

Altia produces, markets, sells, imports and exports alcoholic beverages in in the Nordic and Baltic countries. Annual net sales amounts to approximately €500 million and the total number of personnel is approximately 1,200.

Altia’s own brands include: Blossa, Chill Out, Explorer, Grönstedts, Jaloviina, Koskenkorva, OP Anderson, Renault and Skåne Akvavit. Altia’s partner brands represent both local and international brand, such as Codorníu, Drosty-Hof, Hardy’s, Jack Daniel’s, Bowmore, Nederburg, Ravenswood and Robert Mondavi.





Comment

Dominic Roskrow

The serious business of bourbon

This is most odd. I’m standing with two American gentlemen in the corner of a very swish steak bar staring at a surreal painting of what we’re being told is a ship exploding as it sails towards a lighthouse. I think.

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