Understanding and appreciating the US market

01 October, 2014

Key questions they’ll have about you are, do your brands represent a gap in their portfolio they are looking to fill?  Do you have existing U.S. volume they can take over and grow? Do your company and brands enhance their image, awareness or profitability? Are you financially sound and have a budget to invest and support the brand?

And don’t forget, finding an importer you want to talk to is step one.  You’ll need a strategy to get their attention and then get a meeting. A common refrain we hear is: “I get 100 calls a week; I take less than 10, and might ultimately have a meeting with one.”

Once you have the meeting scheduled, make sure you are fully buttoned up and focused. Do your homework, take the time to investigate and learn about them so you can present your opportunity in its best light relative to their business strategy. Also, have a defined (meaning written) strategy for how and what you want to accomplish in the US.

If you do make it through the constraint of the narrow part of the hourglass, recognise the real work is just starting. You’ll need to consult an attorney with experience in wine/spirit/beer import contracts, a strategy for managing existing inventory, a plan for representation, management and oversight of the relationship, and finally, ongoing support such as winemaker visits and shared marketing support programming.





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Tess Posthumus

Talking the challenges of cocktail weeks

Having recently returned from the US visiting both Oakland and Arizona Cocktail Weeks I was amazed by the differences in approach. In Oakland there was a much bigger trade focus and it felt more relaxed, whereas in Arizona it was one massive party for consumers.

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