Castelnau releases second prestige cuvée

26 April, 2018

Champagne Castelnau has launched Hors Catégorie CCF 2067, the second prestige cuvée to be released as part of its premium Hors Catégorie collection.

Champagnes from Castelnau in the Hors Catégorie collection, meaning “beyond categorisation” are named after a famous mountain passes of the Tour de France, for which Castelnau is the official champagne.

Managing director of Champagne Castelnau, Pascal Prudhomme, was in London earlier this week to unveil the new cuvee, and he said: “With this premium cuvée we want to delight and surprise our customers and consumers with something different, radical and precious.

“The blend is dominantly Pinot Meunier, which is relatively unusual for a prestige champagne, because we want to challenge the conventional wisdom that prestige champagnes should be Chardonnay or Pinot Noir dominant.

“Our chef de cave (cellar master) Elisabeth Sarcelet, is a great believer in Pinot Meunier, and with this fine champagne she has created a cuvée which is worthy of the Hors Catégorie name.”

The first champagne in the Hors Catégorie collection was launched in 2016 and named CT 2115 after Col du Tourmalet at 2115 metres.

Hors Catégorie cuvées are the most premium Champagnes made by Castelnau, and each cuvée release is a limited edition of 3,600 bottles, retailing for around £100 in the UK.

Champagne Castelnau is celebrating its 6th year in 2018 as the official champagne of Amaury Sport Organisation (ASO), owners and organisers of the Tour de France. 

Prudhomme added: “The determination and dedication of the cyclists in the Tour de France reflect the personality and commitment of the winemaking team at Champagne Castelnau and we are proud to have a close association with this great competition.”

Champagne Castelnau Hors Catégorie CCF 2067 will be available to taste on the Castelnau Wine Agencies stand, number D22 at the London Wine Fair.





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